There official impunity, and has created an

There is a high risk of corruption in many sectors in Bulgaria. A lack of autonomy and transparency in the judicial system has weakened corruption investigations and property rights, encouraged public official impunity, and has created an uncertain investment environment. At the same time  political parties and political leaders, police and administrative officers in the judicial  system, prosecutors are perceived to be the most corrupted groups in Bulgaria.

Since 1998 the Center for the Study of Democracy has pioneered the anti-corruption efforts of the Bulgarian civil society. CSD introduced an innovative public-private coalition format for co-operation among NGOs, governmental institutions and individuals for delivering anti-corruption awareness raising and policy advocacy.  It consisted of three pillars: annual anti-corruption policy forums, annual Corruption Assessment Reports and the Corruption Monitoring System (CMS).

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

CMS is based on regular victimization surveys among the population and the business community, which benchmarks corruption dynamics. The system has been included in the UN Anti-Corruption Toolkit as a best national practice and has served as an example in the development of similar efforts for monitoring the implementation of the UN Convention against Corruption, and more recently in the run-up to the first EU Anti-Corruption Report. In 2010 on request from the European Commission CSD produced the first ever Study on the Links between Corruption and Organized Crime, which would serve to underpin EU’s fledgling policy efforts in this domain. CSD will continue to contribute to the debate on EU’s anti-corruption policy and to specific policy and practical measures to improve good governance in Bulgaria. Also in 2016 The National Strategy for Preventing and Countering Corruption created  a single unit for analysis and investigation of assets and conflict of interest of persons occupying high state positions. The Strategy contained specific measures in six priority areas: building an effective system of anti-corruption bodies and units; countering high-level corruption, suppressing political corruption with an emphasis on ‘electoral corruption’; preventing and combating corruption in the Interior Ministry and judicial bodies; relieving citizens from petty corruption and creating public intolerance to corruption. The problem in Bulgaria is that  there is a law but it is not implement and no one is punished.

The case of Bulgaria shows that reforms that need to be placed in the anti corruption  agenda is urgent and profound. Reforms that have been implement have no obvious result so  a restart of the system on enforcement and inspection agencies is needed. political interference in the work of regulatory enforcement and inspections institutions should be discontinued and should be balanced with effective oversight by other institutions. Also monitoring of the incomes and assets of public officials, including officials in regulatory, enforcement and inspection institutions should be more effective.  

Legal framework. Bulgaria’s criminal law covers all forms of offenses of corruption and illicit use of influence covered by the Council of Europe’s legal acts on corruption. However, as noted by the Council of Europe’s Group of States against Corruption (GRECO), this “legal framework is too complex, fragmented between the Penal Code, other national laws and the various instruments of ratification of international instruments”, which inevitably affects its implementation.

Civil society can play a significant role on fighting corruption. Civil organizations a should promote anti corruption campaigns and strengthen the idea of a society free of  corruption. At the same time NGO’s can corporate with public administrative, especially from the educational system  and promote the anti corruption mentality through education. Of course, society should support the implement of justice and increase the political participation of citizens and so public trust in government will increase.

Many young people have the desire and capacity to transform the world and have the potential to positively affect future anti-corruption efforts. As the new generation of politicians, entrepreneurs and civil society actors, they have an important role to play in bringing a new culture of integrity to all levels of society; but they are also the most vulnerable. They should therefore be taught how to effectively detect, prevent and fight corruption.

To this end, it is very important to devise appropriate empowerment strategies to raise young people’s awareness and understanding of corruption and the way it undermines democratic societies, and at the same time empower them to stand up against corruption.

Education is undoubtedly central to preventing corruption. It should begin from the earliest age – at kindergarten and elementary school levels – and continue throughout the school career. It should also include professional training of supervisors and other education staff in ethical questions in the process of life-long learning.

Economic development and an increase in per capita GDP are among the factors which have been said to reduce corruption levels.  Furthermore,  measures for tackling Income Inequality and Reducing Poverty in  Bulgaria is create  jobs by investing in infrastructure, developing renewable energy sources, renovating abandoned housing and significantly increasing affordable housing investments, and making other commonsense investments to revitalize neighborhoods. Improve job quality and strengthen families by raising the minimum wage ensuring pay equity strengthening collective bargaining  and enacting basic labor standards such as fairer overtime rules, paid sick and family leave, and right to request flexible and predictable schedules. Help low-income youth and adults access employment and training opportunities that lead to economic success. Ensure that everyone, including low-wage working families and single adults, has access to basic health and nutrition.