Nurses can communicate their Economic Worth Essay

Nurses can communicate their Economic Worth.

ABSTRACT:

Nurses can communicate their Economic Worth. Surely, a nurse would sometimes encounter gloomy days.  Evidently, nursing jobs are economically strain and burn out inducing. Obviously, the nurse jobs are not economically motivating for a day’s pay.  Unquestionably, there is an economic reason for some hospitals to seemingly not to care for the economic worth of its nurses. Truly, other nurses feel that the cost of being a nurse is economically feasible.  Surely, nurses feel that economics does not mean money.  Correctly, many nurses feel that they are second class citizens in the hospitals. Correctly,  nurses must show that they are economically well -fed.  Surely, the nurses must communicate that they are economically professionals.

Definitely, the nurses must now show that the provision and the future of healthcare in the United States continues to be a hotly contested economic issue.  Definitely, the nurses must now show that the provision and the future of healthcare in the United States continues to be a hotly contested economic, issue.  Evidently, the nurses must announce that they are an economical force.  Undoubtedly, nurses must economically show that they are the most highly trained caregivers with regular patient contact.  Clearly,  nurses must help in the heath care system.  Conclusively, Nurses can communicate their Economic Worth.

Nurses can communicate their Economic Worth.

INTRODUCTION:

Nurses can communicate their Economic Worth. There are two ways of communicating. They are body language way and the spoken or verbal way. It is a well known fact that nurses are paid like the ordinary worker. Also, nurses are often burned out each day and they are physically drained of their energies after a day’s work. The nurses must communicate their economic worth to the general  public.  The nurses must communicate their economic worth to the hospital management. The following paragraphs will explain the different ways that the nurses can communicate their economic worth.

BODY:

As a woman, a nurse would sometimes encounter gloomy days. These days are characterized by the nurse feeling unnoticed. Many nurses feel that limitations have been thrown in front of their aspirations. Some nurses feel that the doors of economic opportunity have been hinged shut to them. Thus, they ventured into the field of nursing only a second or last resort. Some nurses nurture the feeling that his or her ambition to be a doctor could not be realized due to economic reasons. Nursing was the second choice in order to earn a living.  In fact, some nurses who were promoted from staff to chief nurse feel that there more more qualified nurses than her for such a responsibility -laden position.  Surely, a nurse would sometimes encounter gloomy days.

Further, nursing jobs are economically strain and burn out inducing. Some nurses who had been promoted could not accept their new job description. The reason is that they had been used to directly sponge -bathing a patient and constantly consoling a terminally ill patient. Her or his new position as chief nurse would make watch someone else make the patients feel as comfortably at home as possible. On the other hand, some nurses, especially those from the third world countries, feel that they deserve to be promoted because they had already served many years as a low ranking nurse. There are nurses who feel that their efforts to be noticed by their superiors and patients have come to naught. Many women nurses beamed with pride as they agreed that the rewards they received were intrinsic to their jobs specifications. Many of these women nurses feel that the reward they prefer is an increase in salary, more benefits and the like.  Evidently, nursing jobs are economically strain and burn out inducing.

And, the nurse jobs are not economically motivating for a day’s pay. The nurses are overloaded with too many patients. Many women nurses feel that mastery and accomplishment in their job  meant doing something that worked or knowing that what was right and good can be done. Many nurses were satisfied to conquer each hard -working hospital day tackling the different tough assignments beside five or more patients in day. A Ginztberg study in 1966 showed that there were four categories of motivating values that shaped the careers of educated women. The study showed that there are four main categories of motivating values. These four values had shaped the careers of educated women, especially the nurses. Obviously, the nurse jobs are not economically motivating for a day’s pay.

And, there is an economic reason for some hospitals to seemingly not to care for the economic worth of its nurses. One reason is that many of the hospitals are now hiring nurses from India and other countries around the world. Many of these hospitals offer lower wages for these foreign -trained nurses as compared to the local nurses. The common reason that hospitals give for offering low wages to these foreign trained nurses is that they are being trained in the real life hospital duty outside the four walls of the classroom.  Unquestionably,  there is an economic reason for some hospitals to seemingly not to care for the economic worth of its nurses.

Also, economic pay could include non -monetary issues.  In the Gintzberg study, influential women felt happy. Their happiness was due to the fact that they had the power to hire and fire people. These women felt they were influential because they were able to change things under their leadership. Another woman felt that she was influential in helping get an increase in the salary of a fellow nurse. One nurse administrator was proud with helping her fellow nurses get hospital job promotions and salary increases during her time. Other nurses felt that they were influential because they won new friends (patients) while on hospital duty. Many nurses felt it was part of their chosen endeavor to hear the stories of their patients. Many of the nurses’ comments  regarding being economically influential is evident. For, many of these nurses believe that the happy smiles of their patients are economically rewarding to them. this is called communal motivation. Undoubtedly,  economic pay could include non -monetary issues

Plus, other nurses feel that the cost of being a nurse is economically feasible.  Other women felt that it was worth all the costs to be a nurse. Many nurses had to handle such costs as the women’ personal lives. The costs mentioned here include interruption of the women’s personal, family lives. Many of the nurses had to spend lesser time with their children because this is one of the characteristics of being hired as a nurse. Some of the nurses feel that they are economically happy even though the nurse jobs had to give lesser time to their friends, parents and other relatives and friends.  Truly, other nurses feel that the cost of being a nurse is economically feasible.

In addition, nurses feel that economics does not mean money.  In fact, some women nurses had to literally postpone their marriage because the hectic hospital duty can not be exchanged for the blissful honeymoon and wedding entourage.These women nurses got married during their thirties or more. Another divorced nurse opined that she will not get married again because she prefers to be ‘married’ to her patients. Another nurse felt that her hectic job as a nurse kept her from having quality time with her husband and kids. Another nurse was able to save her thirty -eight year marriage from the brink  of extinction. One nurse who was a mother found it very revitalizing the to list all the costs as well as the economic benefits of her nursing job.  She stated that “I gave up having homemade cookies, and I gave up seeing my child take her first step,and I gave up seeing my son be the turkey in the school’s Thanksgiving play.”(1988, p. 193). Surely, nurses feel that economics does not mean money.

Economically, many nurses feel that they are second class citizens in the hospitals. This stereo typing of nurses as the silent majority has been triggered by the recognition of doctors as the healers of the sick and the nurses have been portrayed in elementary school books as helpers of the doctor. Our society is influenced by its culture. and the American culture shows preference by many young girls to be lawyers or engineers or doctors or accountant. Culture involves subjectivity. It includes the values, beliefs and interpretations and practices of the community and society as a whole. Practices include the rituals and collective patterns of action. Culture is an ambiguous word that is certainly full of varied contradictions and interpretations of one singular event in a person’s life. Culture, according to Clifford Geertz are the systems of interacting symbols, patterns of inter -working meanings. Correctly, many nurses feel that they are second class citizens in the hospitals.

Economically, nurses must show that they are economically well -fed. In the nursing profession, the nurse must know how to advantageously interpret individual professionalism. Professionalism in hospitals brings up the ideas of expertise, autonomy and altruism. The hospital scene carries with it the culture of white collar jobs being superior to the blue collar jobs. This has been true with the medical doctors who possess the autonomy, specialized knowledge, altruistic service and rapid social mobility. And, the nurses are typically and culturally segmented into a group of workers as self -described occupational have -nots who are zealously striving toward what they think as the prize in American society.  Many think that the prize is being propped on on the pedestal of professionalism in action and not only in words. Many nurses seem to interpret their profession in different ways. Correctly,  nurses must show that they are economically well -fed.

Also, the nurses must communicate that they are economically professionals.  Many nurses in low class positions feel that professionalism is synonymous with management control over here work conditions. Seventy percent of the medium class positions describe professionalism as the combination of work control and popular individualism. This is described as achieving a nurse’ personal freedom thru the use of credentials. Sixty percent of the nurses in high hospital positions describe individualism believe that professionalism is capitalist individualism. Individualism is described as the achieving maximum power and profit through market control over the nurse’s job and individual credentialism. In short, many nurses define professionalism in their field as confrontational, negotiational and redefining. Individualism in the non -hospitable work environment is often described as the equal opportunity of individuals to excel in their chosen field of endeavor. Surely, the nurses must communicate that they are economically professionals. (Goodman-Draper, 1995, p. 88).

In addition, the nurses must now show that the provision and the future of healthcare in the United States continues to be a hotly contested economic issue. Health care has now moved from the private healthcare industry to a more bureaucratic and collective healthcare system. This is characterized by the single -payer, state -run system under the failed Clinton reforms. Many nurses in the United States have bonded together to be a force to reckon with. The nurse groups have actively formed rallies in relation to their working conditions and salaries. Specifically, the California Nurses Association are very vocal with their demands for more economic benefits in the hospital work place. A beautiful striking nurse slogan i saw goes “we are saving the patients, but who will economically save the nurses”. Definitely, the nurses must now show that the provision and the future of healthcare in the United States continues to be a hotly contested economic issue.

Further, the nurses must now show that the provision and the future of healthcare in the United States continues to be a hotly contested economic, issue. Many United States hospitals hire foreign -trained nurses to beef up their stark lack of nurses working in the graveyard shift and other stress -laden and burn out inducing hospital conditions . Nurses, since the 1060s have joined nurses’ unions to drum up support for their collective bargaining agreements with the hospital managers. Thus, there is a large demand for the nurses to service the old generation of today and the near future. Many workers nowadays have been stripped of their healthcare benefits by their employers because of the high cost of maintaining the periodic health care dues. The workers must now be wary about the government’s decline in focusing on the healthcare situation. Definitely, the nurses must now show that the provision and the future of healthcare in the United States continues to be a hotly contested economic, issue.

Further, the nurses must announce that they are an economical force. The workers an the aging population are very worried about the delivery and quality of stretched and overburdened healthcare services. These services are the realm of the unsang heroes of America -the nurses (Apesoa-Varano & Varano, 2004). On the side of the nurses, this doomsday scenario is the key to their fight for higher wages and better working conditions. Fundamentals of economics tells us that an increase in the need will result to an increase in the purchase price. Thus, now is the right time for the nurses’ organizations to awaken government to listen to their pleas for better working pay as well as working conditions. The normal hospital scene of only a few nurses catering to the healthcare needs of so many patients has to be addressed by hiring more nurses to fill the gap between number of patients and number of nurses. Evidently, the nurses must announce that they are an economical force.

Also, nurses must economically show that they are the most highly trained caregivers with regular patient contact. They are at the heart of the health care industry. Nurses must realize that sick people will find it very awkward and even death defying to sleep in the hospital with no nurses to be found. This the one of the economic benefits that nurses have over other professions. That unique nursing way is having a genuine smile and a healthcaring heart. This is the one of the economic benefits that nurses earn. Yes, the economic benefit for helping a sick man passing by will be paid on the other side of the world. Undoubtedly, nurses must economically show that they are the most highly trained caregivers with regular patient contact.

Going back down to earth, nurses must help in the heath care system. The widespread anecdotal evidences suggesting that problems in the health care system has negative effects on the work place experiences of nurses. Yes, nurses are our ‘Samaritan woman’  who are faces with different heath care challenges each tiring day of their hospital lives. The need for nurses is so great that the United States requires all nurses to work overtime to fill the sick person’s need for health care. Truly, the nursing profession in the United States is in crisis. This crisis is brought about by the lack of nurses coupled by many nurses leaving the profession for more economically well paying job and lesser strain and burn out attached. On the other hand, nurses must realize that asking for increase in their salaries would create an increase in the poor man’s hospital bills. Nurses must also realize that helping the sick should not be with greediness (Clark ; Clark, 2003). Clearly,  nurses must help in the heath care system.

Further, nurses must be instrumental in improve their economic conditions. First, the nurses must take up finish the four year course. This will usually translate to higher take home pay. Next, the nurse could enroll in a masteral course. This will translate to another increase in salaries. Finally, the nurse could take up doctoral study. This too will increase her take home pay a third time. The nurse who has graduated from a graduate course and doctoral course can easily apply for a job as a nurse professor. Again, this would give an additional economic benefit because she will be receiving teaching pay. Also, the nurses can apply for a nurse job in another state that offers higher salaries and benefits. Convincingly, Nurses can improve their economic conditions. Surely, nurses must be instrumental in improve their economic conditions (Lyte, 2004, p. 141).

Also, nurses can improve further their economic conditions. The nurses could take another job to augment his or her hospital pay. A nurse who is good in computers can teach word, excel, and typing classes to her neighbors. A nurse can set up a small store near her residence  to sell her wares during his or her off -hospital hours. The nurse who is good in French or Mexican can teach languages during her vacant hours. The nurse who is a good writer can write books or articles that would earn a bundle of money for the rainy days. The nurse who loves plants can sell her plants to neighbors or friends. The possibilities of economically increasing the nurses’ take home pay are bounded only by the fear of the nurse to venture into uncharted territories.  Undoubtedly, nurses can improve further their economic conditions (Boswell, 1992, p. 221.

Nurses can increase their current economic net income. Net income is arrived at by deducting total cash payments from the total salaries. The above paragraphs explains how to increase the take home pay. This paragraphs focuses on reducing the cash payments in order to increase the economic net income. The nurse must do away with unnecessary expenses. the nurse must realize that she can do away with here wants but she can not completely remove her needs. For example, the nurse can stop buying a coke or a high priced lunch. She could replace these wants, coke and high priced lunch, with plain water and a home cooked meal. She could also do house repair instead of hiring a house repair man. She could lessen the number of visits to the movie house, the football games, the baseball games and the basketball games. She or he should see movies at home instead of going to movie theatres. Definitely, nurses can increase their current economic net income (Morton, 2005).

CONCLUSION:

Nurses can communicate their Economic Worth. Surely, a nurse would sometimes encounter gloomy days.  Evidently, nursing jobs are economically strain and burn out inducing. Obviously, the nurse jobs are not economically motivating for a day’s pay.  Unquestionably, there is an economic reason for some hospitals to seemingly not to care for the economic worth of its nurses. Undoubtedly,  economic pay could include non -monetary issues. Truly, other nurses feel that the cost of being a nurse is economically feasible.  Surely, nurses feel that economics does not mean money.  Correctly, many nurses feel that they are second class citizens in the hospitals. Correctly,  nurses must show that they are economically well -fed.  Surely, the nurses must communicate that they are economically professionals.

Definitely, the nurses must now show that the provision and the future of healthcare in the United States continues to be a hotly contested economic issue.  Definitely, the nurses must now show that the provision and the future of healthcare in the United States continues to be a hotly contested economic, issue.  Evidently, the nurses must announce that they are an economical force.  Undoubtedly, nurses must economically show that they are the most highly trained caregivers with regular patient contact.  Clearly,  nurses must help in the heath care system. Convincingly, Nurses can improve their economic conditions. Surely, nurses must be instrumental in improve their economic conditions.   Undoubtedly, nurses can improve further their economic conditions. Definitely, nurses can increase their current economic net income. Conclusively, Nurses can communicate their Economic Worth.

 References

Apesoa-Varano, E. C., ; Varano, C. S. (2004). Nurses and Labor Activism in the United States: The Role of Class, Gender, and Ideology. Social Justice, 31(3), 77+.

Boswell, C. A. (1992). Work Stress and Job Satisfaction for the Community Health Nurse. Journal of Community Health Nursing, 9(4), 221-227.

Clark, P. F., ; Clark, D. A. (2003). Challenges Facing Nurses’ Associations and Unions: A Global Perspective. International Labour Review, 142(1), 29+. Retrieved April 7, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001996760

Goodman-Draper, J. (1995). Health Care’s Forgotten Majority: Nurses and Their Frayed White Collars. Westport, CT: Auburn House.

Lyte, G. (2004). Chapter 9 The Skills Plus Project and Nursing. In Learning, Curriculum, and Employability in Higher Education (pp. 141-153). New York: RoutledgeFalmer.

Morton, J. S. (2005). The Interdependence of Economic and Personal Finance Education. Social Education, 69(2), 66+.

(1988). The Worth of Women’s Work : A Qualitative Synthesis / (A. Statham, E. M. Miller, & H. 0. Mauksch, Ed.). Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.

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